Museum of Industrial Culture is a strange, strange place. You enter a huge hangar – and suddenly find yourself in the world littered with old things. Hundreds of things of all shapes, sizes and purposes. The chaos is divided by some narrow concrete paths, signs and markers are not included. It can seem like a dreadful experience to a modern minimalism enthusiast (and at first, it actually is), but as soon you get yourself together and open your mind for some time traveling, an amazing journey begins.

You can find absolutely everything here. More precisely, all the household items used daily by our Soviet grandparents, and then the parents. Bicycles, cars, motorcycles, ceramic plates and crystal champagne glasses, kitchen and household appliances, all kinds of furniture, old telephones, televisions, radios and the very first computers, toys and school uniforms, posters, gypsum busts of political leaders and all the elements of home decor. The amount of stuff is astonishing.

Let the journey begin. From the garage of a passionate car and motorcycle lover we move to an impromptu radio club, from an authentic photo studio and camera shop – to a TV and reel tape recorders store. Small cozy kitchen filled up with tableware and kitchen supplies, Central Children’s Store full of books and toys, and an old classroom where someone has left his backpack on a double school desk…

Suddenly it turns out that the “chaos” is surprisingly well organized. And somehow you (even if you’re 26) are familiar with most of the objects.

And you realize that these things are not just dusty artifacts gathered together for some lovers of vintage but touching and personal stories of numerous families. Little stories that form the story of one lost country.

Industrial Culture Museum is a place without moody securities and entrance fee. All the objects (except the ones that are hidden in the glass shelves) can be photographed and even touched. Of course Museum of Industrial Culture is a place to come with your older relatives, however all the people who work there are always happy to answer the questions. The museum was actually made by the people you see there. So be sure to come.

Музей Индустриальной КультурыOne the left: ice cream track
Музей Индустриальной КультурыSoda drinks vending machines. “1 coin 3 kopek for mandarine syrop”
Музей Индустриальной КультурыМузей Индустриальной КультурыМузей Индустриальной КультурыМузей Индустриальной КультурыWallpaper rolls
Музей Индустриальной КультурыМузей Индустриальной КультурыSoviet packaging: sugar, tea, matches, candiesМузей Индустриальной Культуры

Музей Индустриальной КультурыМузей Индустриальной КультурыМузей Индустриальной КультурыМузей Индустриальной КультурыМузей Индустриальной КультурыМузей Индустриальной КультурыМузей Индустриальной КультурыМузей Индустриальной КультурыМузей Индустриальной КультурыOn the right: vintage glass perfume bottles. Spotted: my well loved Red Moscow perfume.Музей Индустриальной КультурыМузей Индустриальной Культуры

Official website (only in Russian): Museum of Industrial Culture
Working hours: Every day from 11 am to 7 pm
Address: Moscow, Zarechye ul., 3А (Subway stations: Lyublino, Volzhskaya or Kuzminki)
Free entrance

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